Cookeville Golf & Country Club Championship (1949-1988)

COOKEVILLE GOLF & COUNTRY CLUB
CLUB CHAMPIONSHIP

1949 CHARLES STANTON
1950 HOOPER EBLEN
1951 JERE WHITSON
1952 CHARLES STANTON
1953 CHARLES DARWIN
1954 FRANK ALEXANDER
1955 HUBIE SMITH
1956 BOBBY GREENWOOD
1957 BOBBY GREENWOOD
1958 BOBBY GREENWOOD
1959 BOBBY GREENWOOD
1960 CHARLES STANTON
1961 FRANK ALEXANDER
1962 JOHN GILL
1963 PHILLIP C. WEBB
1964 PHILLIP C. WEBB
1965 PHILLIP C. WEBB
1966 CHARLES STANTON
1967 PHILLIP C. WEBB
1968 JOE BAKER
1969 PHILLIP C. WEBB
1970 DAVID MULLINAX
1971 MACK HUDDLESTON
1972 MARTIN MIGLIORE
1973 JIM ALEXANDER
1974 KEVIN HOUNIHAN
1975 KEVIN HOUNIHAN
1976 PHILLIP C. WEBB (139)
1977 JOHNNY ANDERSON (142)
1978 DOUG STANDIFER (140)
1979 CRAIG KING (145)
1980 CARLEN WEBB (144)
1981 DOUG STANDIFER (138)
1982 DOUG STANDIFER
1983 DOUG STANDIFER
1984 DOUG STANDIFER
1985 DOUG STANDIFER
1986 DAVID DRAPER
1987 DAVID DRAPER
1988 DAVID DRAPER

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Published in: on July 24, 2011 at 6:29 pm  Leave a Comment  

Passing on the lessons — Greenwood teaching golf to his daughter

Passing on the lessons — Greenwood teaching golf to his daughter
by Buddy Pearson Herald Citizen 06.18.11 – 09:00 pm (online edition)

COOKEVILLE — Bobby Greenwood has been giving golf lessons almost all his life. His knowledge and experience of the game crafted from an outstanding amateur and professional career has helped people play better golf. At the age of 72, Greenwood still gives golf lessons although he concentrates mainly on teaching one very important pupil — his 12-year-old daughter Viola.

“I have a great teacher. Dad is a great teacher and, plus, we have a lot of fun,” said Viola. “It’s good to enjoy something you do.”

Viola couldn’t have a more qualified teacher. Greenwood was a 3-time NCAA All-American at the University of North Texas during an incredible amateur career which saw him best players such as Jack Nicklaus and Byron Nelson in match play events. After turning pro, Greenwood spent seven years on the PGA Tour, winning the 1970 Rhode Island Open and taking on the likes of Johnny Miller, Lee Trevino and Arnold Palmer. He captured more than 150 amateur and pro tournaments and has been elected to the Riverside Military Academy, North Texas Athletic and Tennessee Golf Hall of Fames.

“Actually, I kind of in a way, hoped she wouldn’t play golf because I know how tough the game is,” confessed Greenwood. “It’s a lonely game. It’s the most difficult of all games to play correctly. I was wanting her to get into the team sports.”

Viola has tried her hand at team sports, excelling in local youth soccer and softball leagues. But being around a legendary golfer on a daily basis gave her the notion to want to play.

“Viola is a good athlete,” said Greenwood. “She played soccer and softball. She could play basketball if she wanted. She has responded well and she still has a long way to go.”

Viola has just started getting serious about hitting the links this year. She has been practicing hard and learning the game from one of the best ball-strikers to ever tee it up in the state of Tennessee.

“The secret is we don’t have any preconceived goals,” Greenwood explained. “We are just out there having fun and seeing what happens. If she is good enough to become a pretty good player then it will happen. If she’s not, then we won’t force it. We are just having fun and introducing her to the game.”

Having a golf professional for a dad has done more than just show Viola how to hit a golf ball. Greenwood and his wife Elma have been able to take Viola to different courses and tournaments around the country that have special meaning. Greenwood has taken his family to the Masters and to the Player’s Championship at TPC Sawgrass where he was the head pro. They have gone to Berumuda to the Grand Slam of Golf. All of these experiences has introduced Viola to Greenwood’s past as well as opened the door to meeting some of the top players on the PGA Tour today.

“It’s a great experience and I’m pretty lucky to get to go to great famous golf courses and it is helping me learn,” Viola said. “Watching people helps.”

Watching Greenwood give golf lessons to other people has also helped Viola improve her game. She has become a student of the game, getting a daily dose of golf from her loving dad.

“It is a hard game. He says it takes five years to learn the game so I think I’m on the right track,” Viola said. “I’m learning slowly but surely.”

While Greenwood shares his advice and expertise on golf, he also shares stories of his glorious past with his daughter. That’s something she cherishes as much as how to swing a club.

“I love hearing his stories,” said Viola. “I’m pretty proud of him.”

Greenwood is equally proud of his well-mannered and talented daughter. The two of them recently teamed up in their first-ever tournament, competing in the Kiwanis Cookeville Children’s Museum Adult Youth Golf Scramble at White Plains. The Greenwoods finished second in their flight but came out winners as far as having fun and enjoying the experience goes.

“The first tournament being able to play with my dad was really fun,” said Viola. “It was a really great experience.”

“It was a great tournament and we had a great time,” added Greenwood. “It was something I will never forget.”

Greenwood looks to continue teaching his daughter about golf and sharing his knowledge and experience with her, hoping that’s something she will never forget.

Copyright 2011 Herald Citizen. All rights reserved.  © herald-citizen.com 2011

Published in: on June 19, 2011 at 7:42 am  Leave a Comment  

Bobby Greenwood @ a local History Museum

Bobby Greenwood has been one of the featured athletes at the Cookeville History Museum’s “Sports Theme” exhibit from November 27, 2010 to January 8, 2011.

Excerpt from Herald-Citizen, online edition, 11/21/2010

” The exhibit will also focus on those local athletes who have played their sport on the professional level, from Tennessee Tech football player Jim Youngblood, a nine-time NFL Pro Bowl participant; PGA Tour players Bobby Greenwood and the late Bobby Nichols; and even J.J. Redick, a former Duke guard who now plays for the Orlando Magic. He was born in Cookeville, Tennessee.

”It’s kind of a broad look at sports in Putnam County,” Duke said of the exhibit. “But we especially want to recognize those individuals who have excelled in the sport they loved.”

Read more:  Herald Citizen – Sports the theme of new exhibit at history museum

Published in: on January 4, 2011 at 7:53 pm  Leave a Comment  

Greenwood received TPGA Distinguished Career Award Feb. 28

 Published by Fairfield Glade VISTA, March 14th, 2010

The Tennessee Section PGA unveiled the new Distinguished Career Award (DCA) Display at Golf House Tennessee February 28.  The Distinguished Career Award recognizes current or former Tennessee PGA Section members who have had outstanding careers as PGA Professionals based on service to his or her club, course or employer, service and leadership to the Association, community service, professional playing record and teaching ability.  The Distinguished Career Award acknowledges Tennessee PGA Professionals as vital and significant contributors to the game of golf.    The renovated hallway now recognizes twenty eight PGA Professionals including names such as Cary Middlecoff, Lou Graham, Mason Rudolph, Joe Campbell, Gibby Gilbert and Loren Roberts.

Joining that elite list of former PGA Tour players is Cookeville’s own, Bobby Greenwood. 

 
Photo Caption: Tennessee PGA President Hunt Gilliland (left) presents the Distinguished Career Award to former PGA Tour Player Bobby Greenwood.

 Greenwood was introduced to golf at Cookeville Country Club at the age of twelve.  After earning a three-time NCAA All-American career at North Texas State University, Greenwood was noted as one of the best amateurs in the country during the 1960’s. He was twice ranked in the Top 10 Amateur golfers in Americ

a by Golf Magazine.  Greenwood won the 1966 Tennessee State Amateur and the 1968 Tennessee State Open, and played the PGA Tour from 1969 to 1975 carding six top 10s and fifteen top 25s, while also winning the 1970 Rhode Island Open while on the Tour.  He played in two US Opens, two USGA Amateurs, eight Tennessee Cup Match Teams, three Senior Tenn

essee PGA titles and currently is the President of his own golf course architectural firm in Cookeville. Bobby designed and supervised construction of our Dorchester Golf Course in 1977. Greenwood is also a member of the University of North Texas Sports Hall of Fame, Tennessee Golf Hall of Fame and Riverside Military Centennial All-Sports Hall of Fame.

Greenwood was one of fifteen past and current recipients who were on hand for this special unveiling in Franklin, Tennessee in front of their fellow Tennessee PGA Professionals and special guests.

See a future edition of the VISTA for an upcoming special event featuring an appearance by Bobby Greenwood.

Source: FairfieldGladeVista.com

Published in: on March 30, 2010 at 7:34 am  Leave a Comment  

Bobby Greenwood receives Distinguished Career Award from Tennessee Section of the PGA

Published by Crossville-Chronicle, March 9, 2010

 Bobby Greenwood, longtime golf professional and Cookeville native, received the Tennessee PGA Distinguished Career Award last week at the Golf House of Tennessee near Franklin, where the award was unveiled.

The Distinguised Career Award is the highest honor the Tennessee PGA can bestow upon a golf professional. It recognizes current or former Tennessee PGA Section members who have had outstanding careers as PGA Professionals based on service to their club, course or employer, service and leadership to the association, community service, professional playing record and teaching ability. The Distinguished Career Award acknowledges these Tennessee PGA Professionals as vital and significant contributors to the game of golf.

Greenwood and fellow  members of the Tennessee  Golf Hall of Fame – Pat Abbott, Cotton Berrier, Joe Campbell, Harold Elller, Gibby Gilbert, Lou Graham, Don Malarkey, Cary Middlecoff, Teddy Rhodes, Loren Roberts and Mason Rudolph, who were also received the Distinguished Service Award, according to Buddy Pearson of the Herald-Citizen.

Greenwood joins an elite group of only 26 other PGA Professionals who have received this honor.

Photo caption: Tennessee PGA president Hunt Gilliland, left, presents the Tennessee PGA’s Distinugished Career Award to former PGA Tour player Bobby Greenwood.

The Cookeville native was introduced to golf at the Cookeville Country Club at the age of 12, according to the Tennessee Section of the PGA.

After earning a three-time NCAA All-American career at North Texas State University, Greenwood was noted as one of the best amateurs in the country during the 1960s.

He was twice ranked in the Top 10 Amateur golfers in America by Golf Magazine. 

Greenwood won the 1966 Tennessee State Amateur and the 1968 Tennessee State Open, and played the PGA Tour from 1969 to 1975 carding six top 10s and fifteen top 25s, while also winning the 1970 Rhode Island Open while on the Tour. 

He played in two US Opens, eight Tennessee Cup Match Teams and currently is the President of his own golf course architectural firm in Cookeville. 

Greenwood is also a member of the University of North Texas Sports Hall of Fame, Tennessee Golf Hall of Fame and Riverside Military Centennial All-Sports Hall of Fame.

Greenwood was one of fifteen past and current recipients who were on hand for this special unveiling in Franklin, Tennessee in front of their fellow Tennessee PGA Professionals and special guests.

 Photo caption:  There was a special greeting of two old PGA Tour players, Mason Rudolph, left, and Bobby Greenwood at Golf House of Tennessee last week, when Greenwood received his Distinguished Career Award.

 

Published in: on March 29, 2010 at 9:33 pm  Leave a Comment  

Greenwood earns Distinguished Career Award

Herald-Citizen

March 2, 2010    Cookeville, Tennessee

NEWS

Greenwood earns Distinguished Career Award

Buddy Pearson

Herald-Citizen Managing Editor
Tuesday, Mar 02, 2010
PHOTO CAPTION: Cookeville golfing legend Bobby Greenwood looks at the replica of the late Bobby Nichols Distinguished Service Award at Golf House of Tennessee. Greenwood was honored with the Tennessee PGA Distinguished Career Award Sunday, one year after his good friend Nichols was honored with the award.
 
FRANKLIN — Bobby Greenwood won enough trophies and plaques during his competitive golfing days to fill a house. A member of three different halls of fame, Greenwood can add another honor to his long list of accolades. The Cookeville native and former PGA Tour player has received the Tennessee PGA Distinguished Career Award. Greenwood was recognized on Sunday night at Golf House of Tennessee where the new permanent Distinguished Career Award display was unveiled.

“It’s just another award that I don’t feel like I deserve,” said the humble Greenwood. “To be a part of this display and all the history here, it’s beyond your wildest dreams.”

The Distinguised Career Award is the highest honor the Tennessee PGA can bestow upon a golf professional. It recognizes current or former Tennessee PGA Section members who have had outstanding careers as PGA Professionals based on service to their club, course or employer, service and leadership to the association, community service, professional playing record and teaching ability. The Distinguished Career Award acknowledges these Tennessee PGA Professionals as vital and significant contributors to the game of golf.

A member of the Tennessee Golf Hall of Fame, Greenwood was recognized along with fellow Hall of Famers Pat Abbott, Cotton Berrier, Joe Campbell, Harold Elller, Gibby Gilbert, Lou Graham, Don Malarkey, Cary Middlecoff, Teddy Rhodes, Loren Roberts and Mason Rudolph, who were also receiving the Distinguished Career Award.

“It was great to see Mason Rudolph and see him looking so healthy,” Greenwood said. “It’s amazing to see some of these guys and to be recognized along with them.”

Greenwood joins an elite group of only 26 other PGA Professionals who have received this honor. Among those is the late Bobby Nichols, who passed away almost two years ago. As a long-time PGA Professional and owner of Ironwood, Nichols mentored many of the state’s PGA Professionals while he served more than 30 years as the head coach of the TTU golf programs.

As a player, Nichols won more than 100 tournaments, including the 1992 Tennessee State Open as well as the 1994, 1996 and 1997 Tennessee Senior Opens. He qualified and played in 21 PGA Club Professional Championships and two U.S. Senior Open Championships. Nichols also qualified for every Tennessee PGA Cup Match Team from its inception in 1968 to 2007, serving as team captain four times. Two of Nichols’ longtime friends, Elaine Garrison and Kim Meredith, were on hand to accept his replica, which will be on permanent display.

“It’s bittersweet,” Garrison said. “I should be happy and excited but I’m sad. I guess it will always be that way.” Nichols and Greenwood were the best of friends for nearly 50 years. After being introduced to golf at the Cookeville Country Club at the age of 12, Greenwood’s amateur career took off like a rocket. During the 1960s, he dominated amateur play in the state of Tennessee, winning the 1966 State Amateur and the 1968 State Open, becoming just the third of eight golfers to accomplish the feat. He was one of just seven golfers to ever win the prestigious Sunnehanna Amateur twice and was ranked by Golf Magazine among the nation’s Top 10 amateurs on two occasions.

Greenwood began a glorious collegiate career at Tennessee Tech, finishing as the Ohio Valley Conference runner-up as a freshman. After transferring to North Texas State, he was a three-time All-American while finishing second in three consecutive Missouri Valley Conference Championships.

After turning pro in 1969, he made the cut in 72 PGA events, finishing in the Top 10 six times and in the Top 25 in 15 different tournaments. “People are the most important thing,” said Greenwood, who is also a member of the North Texas University and Riverside Military Academy Hall of Fames. “I’ve got trophies and plaques where the name has fallen off and I can’t remember where I won them. People are the most important thing in the world.

“It’s such an honor to have people who care about you come down and be a part of this,” Greenwood continued. “To see friends of Bobby Nichols come down — they love me, too.”

PHOTO CAPTION: Cookeville’s Bobby Greenwood, right, poses with fellow Tennessee Golf Hall of Famer and Distinguished Career Award recipient Mason Rudolph Sunday night at Tennessee Golf House.
Published in: on March 2, 2010 at 10:30 pm  Leave a Comment  

In Memory of Bill Garrett (1940-2010)

“In golf, when you have the “honor” on the tee; then you have earned the right to go first. It seems only fitting that concerning the University of North Texas golf team that Bill Garrett should go first. We, the rest of his teammates look forward to being with Bill once again and perhaps ev…en playing golf with him and enjoying all the promises of God. When I get my new body, as promised by my Lord and Savior, I hope that it is 6’6”tall just like Bill Garrett’s instead of one that is 5’9” tall. The Lord told us to rejoice at death and cry at birth (Ecclesiastes 7:1-4), but I haven’t got the hang of that yet. Heaven must be wonderful for that to be true. May God continue to bless you, roomie. BG”.

[Bill Garrett played on the PGA Tour between 1964-1979]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bill_Garrett_(golfer)

http://www.caringbridge.org/visit/billgarrett

Published in: on March 2, 2010 at 6:20 pm  Leave a Comment  

Greenwood to be awarded the 2010 Distinguished Career Award

The Tennessee PGA has just notified Bobby that he will retroactively be awarded the TN PGA Distinguished Career Award along with the other Former PGA Tour players; Mason Rudolph, Lou Graham, Gibby Gilbert, Joe Campbell and Loren Roberts.

The Distinguished Career Award presentation will take place on Sunday, February 28th and March 1st, 2010 at the TN PGA annual meeting.

Congratulations Bobby!

Published in: on October 28, 2009 at 1:20 pm  Leave a Comment  

Latest Media Release : “On tour with the Tour” ~ by Buddy Pearson

On tour with the Tour
Buddy Pearson
Herald-Citizen Managing Editor
Saturday, Jun 20, 2009

COOKEVILLE — For seven years, Bobby Greenwood was a regular on the PGA Tour. A player who made several cuts and consistent money, Greenwood competed in a lot of PGA Tour events at several different courses.

More than 30 years since teeing it up in his last PGA Tour event, Greenwood is taking a walk down memory lane with his wife Elma and 10-year-old daughter Viola with a tour of the Tour.

There are 20 PGA Tour tournaments or courses where PGA tournaments are being played this year that Greenwood has played in or played on.

There are also four on the Champions Tour schedule.

“It’s bittersweet because I feel like without the injuries I would have won more,” said Greenwood, whose career was cut short by a wrist injury. “It hurts you a little bit when everyone knows what you could have done but I didn’t get to. At the same time I’m very proud of what I’ve done. I should have done a lot better.”

A winner of over 150 amateur and professional tournaments, including the PGA Tour’s Rhode Island Open, Greenwood has been giving his wife and daughter a first-hand look of what life was like on the Tour in the 1970’s.

“This is what my life used to be,” said Greenwood. “This is what I worked 25 years for.”

Greenwood and his family went to the Ryder Cup matches last year at Valhalla and the Grand Slam of Golf in Bermuda.

“Considering my background, where I came from, a third world country, you can only imagine how exciting it is for me to meet and talk with superstars in the world of golf,” said Elma, who is from the Philippines. “I enjoy watching Bobby meet old friends that he played with while on the PGA Tour, and to visit places and famous golf courses where Bobby Greenwood competed while on the PGA Tour is a rare experience.”

One of the best experiences for Elma and Viola came last month when Greenwood returned to TPC Sawgrass in Ponte Vedra, Fla., where Greenwood used to be the head professional.

“We took pictures where I used to give lessons on the range and we went down to where my condo was,” said Greenwood. “It brought back a lot of memories.”

Greenwood was recognized at a breakfast in conjunction with The Players Championship, which is held annually at TPC Sawgrass.

“When I was introduced, it thrilled Elma and Viola,” Greenwood said. Seeing Greenwood get the recognition from the former and current PGA Tour players makes his wife and daughter gush with pride.

“It is interesting that Bobby doesn’t realize the importance and great things that he accomplished during his playing career,” Elma said. “My husband is a very humble and kind man. Viola just enjoys everything and thinks her dad is a superstar.”

The next stop on Greenwood’s tour of the Tour will be in October at Harding Park Golf Course in San Francisco. The President’s Cup will be held there but Greenwood played the course when it was the San Francisco Open.

“It sometimes seems bittersweet to Bobby to revisit a tournament where he competed,” Elma explained. “As we visit various tournament sites, Bobby would share with me his experience and anecdotes that happened with fellow PGA Tour players. I really enjoy hearing the firsthand accounts of things that happened and being there at the spot.”

While Elma enjoys hearing the stories, Viola enjoys getting the autographs of current PGA Tour players. She got Jim Furyk to sign a flag at the Grand Slam of Golf and Phil Mickelson signed a ball at The Players Championship.

“Viola has turned into an autograph hound,” said Elma. “She said, ‘When I get Tiger Woods’ autograph, I will retire.'”

Until then, the Greenwoods plan on continuing their tour of the Tour.

Photos: 

Bobby Greenwood at 2009 The Players Championship

Photo caption: Bobby Greenwood stands near one of the scoreboards at The Players Championship in Ponte Vedra Beach, Florida.

2008 Grand Slam of Golf

 

Photo caption: PGA Tour golfer Jim Furyk signs a flag for Viola Greenwood at the Grand Slam of Golf.

Source: Herald-Citizen

Published in: on June 26, 2009 at 8:07 pm  Comments Off on Latest Media Release : “On tour with the Tour” ~ by Buddy Pearson  

“Memories” – Frontpage News Article by Buddy Pearson

Greenwood appreciating past success these days

Herald-Citizen Managing Editor
Sunday, July 27, 2008
Photo Caption: Bobby Greenwood first learned to play golf at the age of 12 at the Cookeville Country Club. His accomplishments in Amateur and professional tournaments throughout his illustrious career are being recognized more and more these days.
~*~
COOKEVILLE — When you have accomplished as much in golf as Bobby Greenwood has, it’s kind of hard to keep up with it all. But the hall of famer has found a new appreciation for his success on the links. Like a treasure that’s been discovered and put in a museum for everyone to see, Greenwood’s golfing achievements have been found again and put on the Internet for the world to view. With the help of his wife Elma, Greenwood’s storied golf career is chronicled on the Internet at http://www.greenwoodpga.net.

“Honestly, the Internet and my website and the wonderful articles by the sports editor of the paper validated what I did,” said Greenwood. “Even I had forgotten.”

Some of Greenwood’s more memorable golfing escapades are already noted in five different books: My 55 Ways to Lower Your Golf Score by Jack Nicklaus; My Story by Jack Nicklaus; Southern Golf Association: The First Hundred Years by Gene Pearce; The History of Tennessee Golf by Gene Pearce; and, most recently, The History of Sunnehanna Country Club and the Sunnehanna Amateur by John Yerger III. But once he and Elma began researching his past successes for the website, even Greenwood was impressed.

“When my wife put this stuff together and we put the stuff together for the paper, I should of had more confidence (as a player),” Greenwood admitted. “I was a better player than I realized. I think it’s important for a golfer or an athlete to make a note of his accomplishments and awards and read those while they are playing. We forget.”

Greenwood’s career is hardly forgettable. Once he began teeing it up at the Cookeville Country Club at age 12, his work ethic and desire to be the best helped propel him to star status as an amateur and in college.

During the 1960s, he dominated amateur play in the state of Tennessee, winning the 1966 State Amateur and the 1968 State Open, becoming just the third of eight golfers to win both tournaments. He was ranked by Golf Magazine among the nation’s Top 10 amateurs on two occasions. He is just one of seven golfers to ever win the prestigious Sunnehanna Amateur twice, setting the course record with a 63. Most recently, Greenwood was honored in June by the tournament officials at Sunnehanna in Johnstown, Pa., for his past success as a two time champion.

“It was a moving experience. It was really gratifying the way they treated me,” said Greenwood. “They gave me a sport coat and some framed pictures and they were glad to see me. That’s always nice.”

The day after Greenwood flew home to Cookeville, his record fell to one of the participants in the Sunnehanna tournament after 43 years.

“They thought the course record was going to last forever because it had for 43 years,” Greenwood said. “I’ve had somewhere around 30 course records. This was the last course record that hadn’t been broken.”

Records were meant to be broken and Greenwood certainly had his share. In college, he began his career at Tennessee Tech where he finished as the runner-up in the Ohio Valley Conference tournament as a freshman. He then transferred to North Texas State where he was a three-time All-American, placing second in three consecutive Missouri Valley Conference Championships.

Perhaps his most notable, and gratifying, golfing experience came during his college years when he playing at Colonial Country Club in Memphis. Greenwood took on Jack Nicklaus, who has won more major championships than any other golfer, and beat him in match play.

“All I thought about was winning a tournament,” confessed Greenwood. “If I finished fourth or fifth, it didn’t mean anything. I went to Niagara Falls last year and I told Elma I played in the Porter Cup there. We went to Niagara Falls Country Club and they remembered me. They pulled out the program and said ‘Hey, you finished fourth.’ Fourth meant absolutely nothing to me at the time. It was just another failure. Then you look down the list behind me and those great players, who accomplished a lot more than I did, I beat them at that time. I didn’t know that.”

Greenwood beat some good players while he was on the PGA Tour. After turning pro in 1969, he made the cut in 72 PGA events, finishing in the top 10 six times and in the top 25 in 15 different tournaments. His lone victory on the Tour came in 1970 when he won the Rhode Island Open. But injuries played a key role in Greenwood’s decision to leave the Tour in 1975.

“The last tournament I played on tour was the Mexico Open in Mexico City. I remember having a three or four foot par putt and thinking this will be the last putt I will hit as a Tour player and it was,” recalled Greenwood.

“My wrist was in bad shape and my back was bad. I had neck problems and it was becoming pretty tough to play so I quietly retired.”

Greenwood began living the life of a club pro after retiring from the Tour, taking over the No. 1 club job in America at TPC Sawgrass. He recently returned to TPC Sawgrass and enjoyed some fellowship with current PGA Tour players during a recent PGA tournament.

“It was nice,” said Greenwood. “I had breakfast with the Tour players and they introduced me as a former Tour player. It was very gratifying.”

The attention and accolades Greenwood has been getting lately is very gratifying for the 69-year-old. In 2002, he was inducted into the North Texas Hall of Fame. This past year, Greenwood was one of the charter members inducted into Riverside Military Academy’s Sports Hall of Fame. At Riverside, in addition to golf, he excelled in baseball and basketball.

But for his golfing achievements, Greenwood was enshrined in the Tennessee Golf Hall of Fame last fall, becoming the 30th member of the distinguished group.

“It’s an honor,” said Greenwood. “It’s nice to be appreciated.”

While Greenwood has found a new appreciation for his career, he also appreciates the people around him such as his wife and his 9-year-old daughter Viola. He also appreciates a man who was his longtime friend and golfing partner Bobby Nichols. After giving Greenwood’s introduction speech at the Tennessee Golf Hall of Fame ceremonies, Nichols died a few months later from complications in his fight against cancer.

His loss has been felt more by Greenwood than any loss on the golf course.

“I miss him,” said Greenwood. “He and I were like brothers. There will never be another Bobby Nichols.”

Greenwood doesn’t get out and play much golf anymore. He spends time with his family and is still in the golfing business, giving lessons and working as a golf architect when called upon. If he wants to remember something from his great golfing past, all he has to do is log on to the Internet and look at his website and take a walk down memory lane.

Published in: on July 27, 2008 at 6:29 am  Leave a Comment  

Bobby Greenwood: 1965 & 1968 Sunnehanna Amateur Champion

Bobby Greenwood was honored at the 55th Annual Sunnehanna Amateur Tournament of Champions, Johnstown, PA. He was presented a special sport coat at a banquet held at Sunnehanna prior to the 2008 Amateur tournament.

Published in: on June 8, 2008 at 7:47 pm  Leave a Comment  

Sunnehanna Amateur: Greenwood just missed seeing mark fall

BY MIKE MASTOVICH
The Tribune-Democrat

Published: June 08, 2008 12:10 am   

On Wednesday, Bobby Greenwood presented the borrowed putter he had used to establish the Sunnehanna Country Club record for a low round in 1965.

Greenwood, 69, of Cookeville, Tenn., was in Johnstown as an honored guest in conjunction with the 55th Sunnehanna Amateur Tournament for Champions.

In one of local golf’s great ironies, soon after Greenwood returned home this weekend, his 43-year-old record 63 round had been broken by Zach Sucher, who shot a 9-under-par 61 during Saturday’s third round of the Amateur.

“Beautiful,” Greenwood said, when reached by phone in Cookeville. “I had somewhere around 30 course records. This was the last course record that hadn’t been broken. It took 43 years to break it. With the technology and the new ball, every single one of my course records have fallen. This was the last one to go. I’m thrilled and happy. I wish I would have been there to witness it.

“I’m happy for the young man who did it,” Greenwood added. “If he has as much fun with his 61 as I had with my 63, he’s going to have a great future.”

Greenwood established the record during the second round en route to his victory in the 1965 Sunnehanna Amateur. He set the mark in unorthodox fashion.

Greenwood’s luggage and clubs were lost by an airline, so he borrowed woods from club member Jack Vanyo, irons from head professional John Goettlicher and a putter from course superintendent Joe Harlow.

He shot a first-round 70.

When his own clubs arrived the next day, Greenwood continued to use the borrowed putter during his record round of 63.

Bob Zender tied the mark during the second round in 1971, when he also was the overall winner. Lee Williams again tied the record during the third round in 2002, and Michael Sim repeated the feat during the second round three years ago while winning the Amateur after a five-hole playoff.

“I didn’t know the record,” Sucher said after his 61. “I thought it was somewhere around there but I didn’t know I had it by two.”

Greenwood, his wife, Elma, and their 9-year-old daughter Viola attended a banquet held at Sunnehanna prior to the Amateur last week. He was presented a special sports coat.

“A new record will help the tournament,” Greenwood said. “I remember the headlines when I shot 63. The headline was ‘Wow, a 63 at Sunnehanna.’ I’m looking forward to seeing this headline.”

Source: The Tribune-Democrat, Johnstown, PA

Published in: on June 8, 2008 at 7:14 pm  Leave a Comment  

Greenwood: Three-Timer!

Bobby Greenwood was inducted into the Riverside Military Academy on October 13, 2007 in Gainesville, Georgia during the Centennial Celebrations. He was chosen as one of the ten charter members of the school’s All-Sports Hall of Fame. This is Bobby’s 3rd Hall of Fame Induction!!!  This followed the Tennessee Golf Hall of Fame on September 5, 2007  & UNT Sports Hall of Fame in 2002.

He was also a 3-time NCAA All-American!

We are proud of you… Congratulations!

 

Published in: on December 29, 2007 at 10:31 pm  Leave a Comment  

Overton County News: State Golf Hall of Fame adds new members

State Golf Hall of Fame adds new members

Tennessee Golf Hall of Fame will receive four new members.

Tennessee Golf Foundation approved the induction of Ann Baker Furrow, Connie Day (posthumously), Joe Campbell, and Bobby Greenwood. The induction of Furrow, and Day will be held in Maryville during the 2007 Tennessee Women’s Amateur Championship. The date and location for Greenwood and Campbell’s induction is not yet determined.

Bobby Greenwood was introduced to golf at Cookeville Country Club at the age of 12. During the 1960s there was no better amateur player in Tennessee.

Greenwood won the 1966 State Amateur and the 1968 State Open, becoming the third of eight golfers to accomplish this double. Greenwood became one of seven players to win the Sunnehanna Amateur multiple times, winning the event in 1965 and 1968. Golf Magazine ranked him among the nation’s Top 10 amateurs twice.

From 1969 through 1975, he played on the PGA Tour. He made 72 cuts, six Top 10 finishes, and fifteen Top 25s.

Greenwood served as director of golf at Sawgrass Country Club in Ponte Vedra Beach, FL, a design coordinator for Golden Bear International, president of his own golf course architectural firm, and the designer with Kevin Tucker of Fairfield Glade’s Dorchester course. He was editor-in-chief of one of Tennessee’s first golf publications, Nifty Knicker, and a partner in a golf school operation and a discount golf shop.

Ann Baker Furrow greatly affected Tennessee golf on and off the course. Furrow was a five time Tennessee Women’s Amateur Champion with victories in the event spanning nearly 20 years.

Along with her championships, Furrow placed second in the 1962 USGA Amateur Championship. She was recognized as the top-ranked junior golfer in the United States.

She is the first female to participate in a men’s varsity sport at University of Tennessee. She competed for the team in 1964 and 1965.

In 1991, she played a major role in the establishment of a varsity women’s golf team at UT. Through her dedication to the program, she was able to raise more than $2 million toward fully endowing the team.

Connie Day was a lifelong resident of Cleveland and a 4-time champion and a 3-time runner-up in the Tennessee Women’s Amateur Championship. In 1993, she claimed the State Senior Amateur Championship.

She was recognized as one of the top female amateurs in the country by Golf Digest in 1966, and appeared on the cover of Golf World Magazine in April 1967. She was exempt from qualifying for the U.S. Women’s Open for two years, and was an alternate on the Curtis Cup team in 1966 and 1970.

Connie Day passed away August 30, 2002.

Before joining the PGA Tour in 1959, Joe Campbell established one of the nation’s most outstanding amateur golf records. Campbell was a standout golfer and basketball player at Purdue University. He won the 1955 NCAA Championship, along with the 1956, and 1957 Big Ten Conference Championships.

A win at the prestigious Sunnehanna Amateur in 1955 added to his impressive golf resume. Campbell competed in the Masters in 1956, 1957, and 1958 as an amateur.

After college, Campbell made his home in Knoxville.

During his 8-year career on the PGA Tour, he made 103 Top 25s, 43 Top 10s, and won three tournaments. He received Golf Digest’s Rookie of the Year Award in 1959.

From 1965 to 1972 Campbell won five State PGA titles. In the 1965 State Open, he set a record shooting 204, 12 under par, breaking the previous low of 207.

Campbell became the golf professional at Knoxville’s Whittle Springs in 1967 and remained there in 1974 before moving back to Indiana.

For more information on the Tennessee Golf Hall of Fame call (615) 790-7600 or visit the Golf House website at www.golfhousetennessee.com.

Source: Overton County News

Published in: on November 14, 2007 at 1:23 pm  Leave a Comment  

Greenwood’s RMA Hall of Fame Induction

Greenwood named to academy’s hall of fame

By Ed Greif / sports@crossville-chronicle.com

Long-time PGA professional Bobby Greenwood was inducted into the Riverside Military Academy Hall of Fame recently in Gainesville, GA, as part of the school’s centennial celebration.

 

“So, when I was contacted by Colonel Guy Gardner, former space astronaut and superintendent of Riverside Military Academy that this year, 2007, was the Centennial Celebration for the school and I was to be one of the 10 to be inducted as charter members of the Sports Hall of Fame, I was surprised, but rather puzzled. You see RMA has always been a powerhouse school in athletics,” said Greenwood, who was also inducted into the Tennessee Golf Hall of Fame on Sept. 5.

“The year that I attended RMA, 1957, I can recall 10 cadets that were better athletes than I was at school that year. But, I’ll take it,” Greenwaod added. “Then, Sept 5 of this year, I was inducted into the Tennessee Golf Hall of Fame — another overwhelming experience. This award coming from my peers in Tennessee golf was indeed quite a surprise and also overwhelming.

“Being inducted into the North Texas University Sports Hall of Fame in 2002 was quite an honor for me. Especially when, after 40 years, all my teammates showed for the induction ceremony.”
Greenwood played three sports at RMA.

He was a third baseman/left fielder on the baseball team in 1957, when he batted .380 with a school record 10 home runs, and played point guard for the basketball team, averaging 20.1 points per game.
Greenwood played either number one or number two on the golf team.

Copyright © 1999-2006 cnhi, inc.

Photos


Bobby Greenwood at the RMA Sports Hall of Fame Museum. He was inducted into the Hall of Fame recently.

Published: October 18, 2007 06:00 pm   

Published in: on October 19, 2007 at 7:34 pm  Leave a Comment  

Cookeville golf pro named to state Hall of Fame

CROSSVILLE CHRONICLE  

Published: September 19, 2007 11:37 am, CROSSVILLE, TN

Cookeville golf pro named to state Hall of Fame

 

Long-time professional golfer Bobby Greenwood of Cookeville was inducted into the Tennessee Golf Hall of Fame on Sept. 5 at Holston Country Club in Knoxville.


“It’s overwhelming. I’m speechless,” Greenwood said to the Herald-Citizen. “The biggest honor is to be inducted with Joe Campbell. I’ll take it. God is great. I’m speechless.”
His long-time friend Bobby Nichols, who is the golf coach at Tennessee Tech, introduced Greenwood, who will also be inducted into the Riverside Military Academy’s All-Sports Hall of Fame later this year. This will be his third hall of fame induction.

“We have been friends for many years and we grew up together,” remarked Nichols. “I’ve watched his game progress through the years. I know what king of player he was back then and how good he was. He is a great man. He’s done all the things you need to do to be in the hall of fame. It is a great honor for him to receive this award and a great honor for me to present it to him.

“I’ve learned so much from him. I think it’s good for someone from Cookeville to be inducted into the golf hall of fame. It’s a great honor,” added Nichols.

“It’s overwhelming. The most important thing to me are people and people who came from El Paso, TX and Melbourne, FL and from South Carolina to be here. It was so moving. I had a great speech all ready and I got so tore up I couldn’t say too much. It tugs at your heart-strings. One time I was about ready to cry and I thought ‘This can’t happen,'” added Greenwood.

Bobby Greenwood was introduced to golf at Cookeville Country Club at the age of twelve. During the 1960s there was no better amateur player in Tennessee. Greenwood won the 1966 State Amateur and the 1968 State Open, becoming the third of eight golfers in history to accomplish this double.

Greenwood became one of seven players to win the Sunnehanna Amateur multiple times, winning the event in 1965 and 1968, setting the course record in 1965 with a 72-hole record of 269 and course record 63 in the second round. Golf Magazine ranked him among the nation’s Top 10 amateurs twice. A three-time NCAA All-American at North Texas State University, Bobby was selected to play on the 10-man Texas Cup Team in 1964. Bobby was inducted into the UNT Hall of Fame in 2002.

He qualified for the PGA Tour in 1969, tying Johnny Miller for third place, and played the PGA Tour for seven years, from 1969 through 1975. He made seventy-two cuts, six top 10 finishes and 15 Top 25s while also winning the 1970 Rhode Island Open while on the Tour.

After leaving the Tour, Greenwood served as director of golf at Sawgrass Country Club in Ponte Vedra Beach, Florida and was the Host pro for two Tournament Players Championships at Sawgrass; a design coordinator for Golden Bear International; president of his own golf course architectural firm and the designer of the Dorchester course at Fairfield Glade; editor-in-chief of one of Tennessee’s first golf publications, “The Nifty Knicker,” and a partner in a golf school operation and a discount golf shop in Nashville. Greenwood won over 150 tournaments in his career.
 

Editor’s note: Buddy Pearson, managing editor of the Herald-Citizen, contributed to this story.

Source: Crossville Chronicle

Copyright © 1999-2006 cnhi, inc.

Photos


Bobby Greenwood, left, is introduced at the Tennessee Golf Hall of Fame ceremonies by Bobby Nichols.


Bobby Greenwood, left, is joined by fellow Tennessee Golf Hall of Fame inductee Joe Campbell.

Published in: on September 29, 2007 at 8:44 pm  Leave a Comment  

Excerpt from Robinson Open Article (PGA Tour)

Published: August 11, 2007 11:49 pm        

Rub of the Green: Memories of Robinson Open are not forgotten

By Bob Arnett
Tribune-Star Correspondent

When the tournament proper began it was ’71 champ, Labron Harris, out in front along with David Graham and 23-year-old Tom Kite, all with 66’s. As the halfway cut came at 143, five pros were in a logjam that included: Bobby Greenwood, Grier Jones, Dean Beman, Babe Hiskey and Charles Coody. By the end of the third round, co-leaders were Beman, Dick Rhyan and Charles Courtney with 204 totals. A young Andy North was two shots back.

For complete article, please click HERE

Source: TribStar.com

Published in: on September 11, 2007 at 8:24 pm  Leave a Comment  

TN Golf Hall of Fame – Schedule of Events

TPGA Section Championship
Sep 5 – Sep 7, 2007
Holston Hills CC

Sep 5   6:00 PM – 9:00 PM Hall of Fame Dinner 
Dinner will be held in the main ball room starting at 6 PM. Hall of Fame inducties include Bobby Greenwood, PGA and Joe Campbell, PGA.  Bruce Pearl Head Basketball Coach of the University of Tennessee will be the special guest speaker of the night.

Source: TNPGA

Published in: on September 11, 2007 at 12:33 pm  Leave a Comment  

Excerpt from WBIR.com – TN Golf Hall of Fame

Knoxvillians share TPGA Section Championship lead

Steve Phillips, Sports Director  

Last Updated: 9/5/2007 7:05:02 PM

In addition to the Championship’s activities, the Tennessee Golf Foundation is inducting two PGA Members into the Tennessee Golf Hall of Fame during the annual dinner being hosted by HHCC. Bobby Greenwood, PGA and Joe Campbell, PGA are the inductees of the 2007 class.

Source: http://www.wbir.com/printfullstory.aspx?storyid=48797

Published in: on September 11, 2007 at 12:25 pm  Leave a Comment  

Missouri Valley Conference Golf Championship

Results from the Missouri Valley Conference: MEN’S GOLF

Per Mike Kern, [Missouri Valley Conference Men’s Golf, Championship Administration, Email dated 9/4/2007]: Bobby Greenwood – “3-straight runner-up finishes at the league championship (1961-62-63).”

1961 – Tulsa, Okla. (Rolling Hills CC)
1. Ralph Baker (Tulsa) – 74-74-77=225
2. Bobby Greenwood – 72-78-79=227
Team Champ:  North Texas

1962 – Peoria, Ill.
1. John Stevens (Wichita) – 70-68-74=212
2. Bobby Greenwood – 75-69-68=212 (lost on the first hole of a playoff to Stevens)
Team Champ:  North Texas

1963 – Peoria, Ill.
1. Jim Ferriell (Louisville) – 74-77-68=219
2. Bobby Greenwood – 76-70-74=220
Team Champ:  North Texas

Published in: on September 10, 2007 at 7:18 pm  Leave a Comment  

Porter Cup, Niagara Falls CC, New York

Bobby Greenwood recently visited Niagara Falls Country Club located in Lewiston, New York just to renew old acquiantances. He remembered playing the Porter Cup but couldn’t remember when it was and how he finished the tournament. Well, surprise! Mr. Roberts, teaching professional at the club, showed him a copy of the 41st & 49th Porter Cup books and found when Bobby played the said tournament… This is what they found:

1965 Porter Cup Results:

Ward Wettlaufer….268
Jack Lewis…………..275
Denny Lyons……….276
Billy Womach………279
Bob Greenwood….280
Harry Toscano……281
Jay Sigel…………….282
Ed Tutwiler……….284
Deane Beman…….285

1966 Porter Cup Results:

Bob Smith…………….276
Marty Fleckman ….279
Denny Lyons ……….279
Bill Harvey ………….280
Ward Wettlaufer….280
Jim Welchers ………282
Bob Greenwood…283
George Boutell…….283
Jack Lewis, Jr……..283
Sherm Finger………283

Published in: on August 24, 2007 at 8:15 pm  Leave a Comment  

3rd HALL OF FAME Induction

FLASH REPORT:

Bobby Greenwood has just been notified by the Riverside Military Academy located in Gainesville, Georgia that he will be inducted into the All-Sports Hall of Fame in 2007. This will be his 3rd HALL OF FAME Induction!!! Congratulations Bobby!!!

God has been good to you… God bless!

Published in: on July 23, 2007 at 3:58 pm  Leave a Comment  

2007 Tennessee Golf Hall of Fame Inductee

BOBBY GREENWOOD

Bobby Greenwood was introduced to golf at Cookeville Country Club at the age of twelve. During the 1960s there was no better amateur player in Tennessee. Greenwood won the 1966 State Amateur and the 1968 State Open, becoming the third of eight golfers in history to accomplish this double. Greenwood became one of seven players to win the Sunnehanna Amateur multiple times, winning the event in 1965 and 1968, setting the course record in 1965 with a 72-hole record of 269 and course record 63 in the second round. Golf Magazine ranked him among the nation’s Top 10 amateurs twice. A three-time NCAA All-American at North Texas State University, Bobby was selected to play on the 10-man Texas Cup Team in 1964. Bobby was inducted into the UNT Hall of Fame in 2002.  He qualified for the PGA Tour in 1969, tying Johnny Miller for 3rd place, and played the PGA Tour for seven years, from 1969 through 1975. He made seventy-two cuts, six Top 10 finishes, and fifteen Top 25s while also winning the 1970 Rhode Island Open while on the Tour. After leaving the Tour, Greenwood served as director of golf at Sawgrass Country Club in Ponte Vedra Beach, Florida and was the Host pro for two Tournament Players Championships at Sawgrass; a design coordinator for Golden Bear International; president of his own golf course architectural firm and the designer of the Dorchester course at Fairfield Glade; editor-in-chief of one of Tennessee’s first golf publications, “The Nifty Knicker”, and a partner in a golf school operation and a discount golf shop in Nashville. Greenwood won over 150 tournaments in his career.

For more information: http://www.golfhousetennessee.com/fw/main/Bobby_Greenwood-1036.html?ModKey=mk$cmsc&LayoutID=&CntID=131

Published in: on July 16, 2007 at 1:33 pm  Leave a Comment  

Bobby Greenwood: Three-Time NCAA-All American

1963 ALL AMERICA GOLF TEAMS

First Team
Roger Eberhardt Wisconsin
Jimmy Gabrielsen Georgia
Bobby Greenwood Texas State
John Lotz San Jose State
Richard H. Sikes Arkansas
Kermit Zarley Houston

Second Team
Peter Choate Stanford
Ken Folkes Wake Forest
Dave Gumlia Minnesota
George Hixon Oklahoma State
John Stevens Wichita
Dave Stockton USC

Third Team
Jim Ewing USC
Daniel Hogan Yale
Mark Hopkins Houston
Robert Littler Jr. Ohio
Jay Sigel Wake Forest
Terry Winter Purdue

1962 ALL AMERICA GOLF TEAMS

First Team
Homero Blancas Houston
David Boyd Georgia
Charles Courtney San Diego State
Labron Harris Jr. Oklahoma State
Jerry Jackson Purdue
John Lotz San Jose State

Second Team
Pete Choate Stanford
Howell Fraser Louisiana State
Peter Green North Carolina
Bobby Greenwood North Texas State
Fred Marti Houston
Tom Weiskopf Ohio State

Third Team
Pete Byer Marshall
Richard Cannon Oklahoma State
George Smith Duke
David Stockton USC
Mike Toliuszis Illinois
Jerry Truax New Mexico

1961 ALL AMERICA GOLF TEAMS

First Team
Frank Beard Florida
Homero Blancas Houston
Richard Crawford Houston
Peter Green North Carolina
Jack Nicklaus Ohio State
Stephen Smith Stanford

Second Team
David Boyd Georgia
Chuck Courtney San Diego State
Jerry Cundari Oregon
Labron Harris Jr. Oklahoma State
Kent Winton Stanford
Jim Wright Oklahoma State

Third Team
Rolf Deming Minnesota
John Lotz San Jose State
Mike Podolski Ohio State
Paul Quinn Maryland
Chuck Wallace Syracuse
Ron Weber Houston

Honorable Mention
Bobby Greenwood North Texas State

SOURCE: http://gcaa.collegiategolf.com/home.jsp?page=298

Published in: on April 26, 2007 at 8:25 pm  Leave a Comment  

Greenwood to be inducted into Tennessee Golf Hall of Fame

vistahalloffame.jpg

Published by Glade Vista, Fairfield Glade, TN, February 27, 2007

Published in: on March 9, 2007 at 5:02 pm  Leave a Comment  

1964 U.S. Amateur (United States Golf Association)

Historical NotesPast ChampionsChampionship Records

 The Championship was played under a revised format which had 150 players come to the site to play 36 holes of stroke play over two days to determine 64 qualifiers for match play. The co-medalists were Robert Greenwood, Jr., Cookeville, Tenn., and Marvin M. Giles, III, Lynchburg, Va., who scored 143.

1964 (Sept.) William C. Campbell d. Edgar M. Tutwiler, 1 up; Canterbury G. C., Cleveland, Ohio; Medalists-143, Marvin M. Giles III, Robert Greenwood Entries: 1,562

http://www.usamateur.org/2004/history/past-champs/1964.html

http://www.usamateur.org/2004/history/past-champions.html

Published in: on February 28, 2007 at 8:45 pm  Leave a Comment  

Flash Report: Greenwood to be inducted into the Tennessee Golf Hall of Fame!

Golfers drive to Hall

The Tennessee Golf Hall of Fame has four new members. Former PGA Tour golfer Bobby Greenwood of Cookeville is a new inductee. Also, longtime amateur and PGA Tour golfer Joe Campbell, who made his home in Knoxville but now lives in Indiana, joins Cleveland native Connie Day, long recognized as one of the state’s top amateurs.  Ann Baker Furrow, who competed on the men’s team at Tennessee in 1964 and 1965, will be inducted. She was a five-time Tennessee Women’s Amateur champion and placed second in the 1962 USGA Amateur Championship.

 

http://tennessean.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070225/COLUMNIST0201/702250392/1107

Published in: on February 26, 2007 at 10:37 am  Leave a Comment  

Past State Amateur Results

From Golf House Tennessee Website: 

1966 – Chickasaw Country Club 
Bobby Greenwood, Cookeville vs. 
Bob Lundy, Memphis 
(Greenwood, 10 & 8 )

 1963 – Jackson Country Club 
Bert Greene, Knoxville vs. 
Bobby Greenwood, Cookeville 
(Greene, 4 & 3) 

1962 – Chattanooga Golf & CC 
Lew Oehmig, Chattanooga vs. 
Bobby Greenwood, Cookeville 
(Oehmig, 19th hole)
http://www.golfhousetennessee.com/fw/main/default.asp?DocID=135

Published in: on February 22, 2007 at 3:15 am  Leave a Comment  

Past State Open Results

From Golf House Tennessee Website: 

1968 – Old Hickory Country Club 
Bobby Greenwood, Cookeville 208
Lew Conner, Nashville 216
Marty Graham, Jr, Nashville 216

http://www.golfhousetennessee.com/fw/main/default.asp?DocID=128

Published in: on February 22, 2007 at 3:06 am  Leave a Comment  

Latest Hole-In-One

Edited: —– Original Message —–

From: Kate Maine

To: RMA Alumni

Sent: Monday, October 23, 2006 4:56 PM

Subject: RMA Alumni Update


Riverside Military Academy Alumni Update – October 2006

Homecoming 2006

Saturday was a busy day of eating, golfing, fishing and reminiscing…..The weather was perfect for a day on the course as well as a day on the lake.  We won’t discuss how many fish were caught or the scores earned on the golf course, however, Bobby Greenwood should be congratulated for his hole-in-one, the eighth of his career.  Congrats, Bobby! ~ END.

*****

PERSONAL NOTE:  Bobby Greenwood made his 8th Hole–In-One during the 2006 Riverside Military Academy Alumni Homecoming in Gainesville, Georgia. It happened on September 30, 2006 at Hole #17th, PineIsle Golf Club, Lake Lanier Islands, Georgia. For more information, please click HERE.

Published in: on October 24, 2006 at 1:35 am  Leave a Comment  

Tennessee Tech Men’s Golf

Tennessee Tech Men’s Golf
All-Time Participation List

Written by Rob Schabert   

Wednesday, 16 March 2005

G
Dirk Gardner, 1973-75
Blake Garrison, 2006
Alex Geary, 1995
Payton Gibbs, 2004-06
Gary Gibson, 1961-64
Steve Gibson, 1963-66
Warren Gilley, 1959
Bill Gish, 1966
Terry Goad, 1987-89
Britt Gober, 1976-77
Brad Golden, 1998
Brent Goodrum, 2005-06
Mike Green, 1978
Bobby Greenwood, 1958
Ryan Greer, 2001-04
Chris Griffin, 1981-82

Source: TTUsports.com

Published in: on August 26, 2006 at 3:13 pm  Leave a Comment  

Greenwood Inducted into North Texas Hall of Fame

FROM HERALD-CITIZEN NEWSPAPER, Cookeville, TN:
Greenwood inducted into North Texas Hall of Fame
By Buddy Pearson
Herald-Citizen Staff

It’s been almost 40 years since Cookeville golfing legend Bobby Greenwood played golf at the University of North Texas, yet the school located in Denton, Texas, still remembers the impact Greenwood had on the program. In a ceremony held recently at UNT, Greenwood was inducted into the North Texas Athletic Hall of Fame.
Greenwood and four other inductees were the 2002 recipients of the University of North Texas Sports Hall of Fame awards and were honored during enshrinement. They each received a plaque and a Hall of Fame ring at the Hall of Fame Breakfast.

“North Texas is a big school and they treated me so nice, giving me the ring and the plaque at the breakfast,” Greenwood said. “North Texas is a great golf school. For me to get voted into the Hall of Fame is humbling. There’s other players who should be in it before me, but I’ll take it.

A three-time NCAA All-American, Greenwood is the only First Team NCAA All-America in the school’s history. During his years at North Texas, the Eagles won three consecutive Missouri Valley Conference Titles.

Greenwood was selected by the NCAA Golf Coaches Association to play in the North-South All-Star matches in his senior year. And, he was also selected to the Prestigious 10-member Texas Cup Team in 1964.

“The greatest thing about it to me was that after 40 years, all my teammates decided to show up for my induction,” Greenwood explained. “I think there was one guy who didn’t show up and nobody knew where he was.”

In his rookie year on the PGA Tour, Greenwood was selected as “Champions Choice” to play in the Colonial Invitational Tournament in Ft. Worth, Texas. Past champions of the Colonial Tournament vote on the rookie to receive a sponsor’s exemption to play.

After spending seven years on the PGA Tour, Greenwood was Director of Golf at Sawgrass Country Club, home of the TPC and most recently Head Professional at Suntree Country Club, a 36-hole Resort and home of the Suncoast Senior Golf Classic.

Greenwood, who currently resides in Cookeville with his wife Elma and daughter Viola, spends his time as a golf-course architect and also gives lessons on a limited basis.

Other than the induction ceremonies, Greenwood doesn’t get back to Denton much to watch any of the Mean Green sports teams, particularly basketball. But he will get a chance to see his alma mater play on Saturday when Tennessee Tech takes on North Texas at 7 p.m. at Eblen Center.

So, who will Greenwood be rooting for?

“I love Tennessee Tech,” Greenwood said. “There’s a different feeling about North Texas. I had a great experience out there and I love Texas people — they are positive and encourage you. I really had a great time there and was successful but Tennessee Tech is my hometown team.”

*****Published December 19, 2002 3:06 PM CST
*****Source: COPYRIGHT ® 2004 Herald-Citizen, a division of Cleveland Newspapers, Inc. All rights reserved. <http://www.herald-citizen.com/NF/omf.wnm/herald/archive_display.html?%5Brkey=0024131+%5Bcr=gdn&gt;

Published in: on August 24, 2006 at 10:39 pm  Leave a Comment  

Induction To The Hall of Fame

Bobby Greenwood was inducted to the Athletic Hall of Fame in November 2, 2002, at the University of North Texas (formerly North Texas State University) in Denton, Texas.  He was inducted with other four inductees, namely: Bill Blakely, Barry Moore, G. A. Moore, and Dee Walker.
 
  “BOBBY GREENWOOD – Greenwood was a three-time letter winner in golf at North Texas from 1961-63, helping lead the Eagles to three consecutive Missouri Valley Conference championships.  As a senior, he led the Eagles to the NCAA championship tournament in 1963, when North Texas placed third.  Greenwood received honorable mention All-America honors as a sophomore in 1961 and was a first-team All-America as a junior and senior.” 

-Source: North Texas Athletics: Mean Green History, http://www.unt.edu/northtexan/archives/f02/hallof.htm, by Elma Greenwood, Cookeville, Tennessee, October 31, 2003.

NOTES WRITTEN ON THE PLAQUE:  “University of North Texas, Athletic Hall Of Fame – BOBBY GREENWOOD 2002 – In the early 1960’s, Bobby Greenwood was instrumental in enhancing North Texas’s stature as a collegiate golf powerhouse when he led the Eagles to three consecutive Missouri Valley Conference championships while earning All-American recognition all three years he was on the team.  As a sophomore in 1961, Greenwood won the Southwest Recreation Championship and earned honorable mention All-American honors.  The next year he was named second team All-American and in 1963 as a senior, Greenwood won the Southern Intercollegiate Championship and was named to the NCAA’s first team All-American team.  Since earning a Business Administration degree from North Texas in 1964, Greenwood has enjoyed a lifelong association with the game of golf, including playing as a PGA Tour professional from 1969-1975.  He won more than 150 amateur and pro tournaments during his playing career, including the Rhode Island Open Championship, the Tennessee Open Championship and the Tennessee Senior PGA Championship three times.  He served as the Director of Golf at the Sawgrass Country Club in Florida, which hosts the Tournament Players Championship, and has been active in golf course designing since 1978.  At the time of his induction, Greenwood was president of the Greenwood-Clifton Golf Design Group in Deltona, Florida.”  – Transcribed by Elma Greenwood, Cookeville, Tennessee, October 31, 2003.

Published in: on August 24, 2006 at 10:17 pm  Leave a Comment  

Excerpts from the History of Tennessee Golf: 1894-2001

(Notes in parenthesis are personal notes from Bobby Greenwood, October 2003)

“Bobby Greenwood played the PGA Tour for seven years. His record as a tour player is pale in comparison to other Tennesseans, but he ranks as one of the Volunteer State’s great amateur players.
 
In the1960s, there was NO BETTER AMATEUR PLAYER in Tennessee and HE WAS ONE OF THE BEST AMATEURS IN AMERICA!  During the 1960s, he earned All-America honors at North Texas State University and was ranked among the national’s Top 10 amateurs by Golf Magazine twice.  He won the 1966 State Amateur and the 1968 State Open before turning pro.  He was the third of eight to complete this double.  (Bobby also won the Rhode Island Open while he was on the PGA Tour.)

Greenwood started playing golf at Cookeville Country Club at the age of twelve.  “I was hanging around the club and Mason Rudolph came to Cookeville to play in a junior tournament,” Greenwood remembered.  “I listened to the members brag on Mason Rudolph.  I was probably the worst junior player there’s ever been.  That may be why I became a good teacher.  When I was seventeen I finally became a pretty good player and started playing what we called the ‘fried chicken circuit,’ in Tennessee, Alabama, and Kentucky.  After Lou Graham was gone, I won thirteen tournaments in one season.” ( *Note: fried chicken circuit means one day medal tournament, per Bobby Greenwood, October 27, 2003.)

Greenwood graduated from Riverside Military Academy in Gainesville, Georgia, in 1957 and played golf at Tennessee Tech (University in Cookeville, Tennessee) his freshman year.  He had aspirations of playing golf at a major college, but got no scholarship offers.  After his freshman year, he called coach Herb Farrell at North Texas State (University in Denton, Texas). “I told him how many tournaments I had won, that my scoring average was 70.3 and he seemed fairly impressed,’ Greenwood said.  “I knew I could make their team.  I went on the train (to Texas) with the understanding that if I made the team he would help me with a scholarship.  I got a room in a boarding house and dug the basement for the music building to make ends meet that first year.”

Greenwood quickly found out playing golf in Texas was not the same as playing golf in Middle Tennessee.  “It was the first time I ever played in the wind,” he said.  “I could win tournaments in Tennessee hitting a high soft fade. (But in the Texas wind) I couldn’t break eighty.  All those guys on the team wanted me to play, but I (instead), hit golf balls until finally figured out how to hit the ball low enough to play in the wind.  My left ear about filled up with sand.  The answer was take two clubs more and hit it easy.  When they held the first team tournament, I won it.  Then they had a match play tournament and I beat Rives McBee, who was the captain of the team (in the finals).  No one ever had beat Rives on the North Texas State course.”

Greenwood may have worked to make ends meet while at North Texas State, but admits he was fortunate to get the opportunity to play big-time amateur golf.  Today it is very expensive to play a full schedule of amateur tournaments.  In the 1960s it was easier financially, but still beyond most family budgets.  Greenwood’s father and grandfather were successful Cookeville businessmen and enabled Bobby to travel and play in the biggest and best amateur tournaments in the country.  “Jerry Maxwell was my caddie and we used to hitchhike to these tournaments (fried chicken circuits),” Greenwood said.  “I never needed a lot of money.  All I did was play ball or golf, but I was very blessed.  They gave me the opportunity to travel to the big tournaments.  At tournaments like the Sunnehanna I would be usually be put up in people’s homes.”  Staying in the home of a club member was a custom of the day during Greenwood’s amateur days.

GREENWOOD PLAYED IN ALL THE BIG TOURNAMENTS – U.S. Amateur, Western, Southern, Eastern, Trans-Miss, (North-South), Sunnehanna, and the Colonial at Memphis, one of the biggest amateur events in the country.  His schedule included the college tournaments and the in-state events, too.

At the 1964 Southern Amateur at Lost Tree in North Palm Beach, Florida, he shot an eight-under par 64 to set a course record.  The Sunnehanna Amateur is a Tournament of Champions.  Only the world’s finest amateurs are invited to play in Johnstown, Pennsylvania.  Don’t plan on getting invited unless you are a nationally ranked player, an All-America selection, a winner of a major amateur tournament, a Walker Cup member, or a defending state amateur or open champion.  Greenwood won the prestigious Sunnehanna in 1965 and 1968.  He is one of the only seven multiple winners.  Tiger Woods played in two Sunnehannas, but he never won one.  In 1965, Greenwood won the event by five strokes.  His eleven-under par 269 wiped out the 273 mark set by Gene Dahlbender of Atlanta in 1960.  He did it the hard way.  For two days he sat on the sidelines during practice rounds, waiting for his clubs to arrive.  Just before round one he borrowed woods, irons, and a putter and shot 70.  (*Per Bobby Greenwood’s account to Elma Greenwood: “I borrowed the clubs from the Green Superintendent, and I had to borrow golf shoes from a gracious member, and I purchased a cap from the Pro Shop. My clubs arrived from the airport for the second round but I kept the borrowed putter and shot 63.” – October 27, 2003).  (He followed the 63 up with rounds of 70 and 66).  He had described his game as “not good.”  He had just come off active duty with the National Guard and had lost twelve pounds and was down to 140.  Ardent Sunnehanna followers were convinced Greenwood’s 269 would stand forever.  It took twenty-seven years before Allen Doyle of LaGrange, Georgia, shot 266.  Greenwood’s 63 (still stands as the 18 hole course record!).  In 1964, Greenwood and Vinny Giles of Richmond, Virginia, were co-medalists in the 1964 U.S. Amateur at Canterbury Golf Club in Cleveland, Ohio.  (Greenwood beat Dave Eichelberger 7-5 in the second round. And, after a heated match, Bobby beat Billy Joe Patton 3-2 in the 3rd round). In 1963, Bill Campbell bested him in the fourth round.  In 1965, the Amateur was contested at stroke play and Greenwood finished in a tie for nineteenth.

In the summer of 1961, Jack Nicklaus was in Memphis defending his Colonial Invitational title.  He lost to Greenwood, who eagled the eighteenth hole and birdied the first extra hole for the victory.  Greenwood lost in the finals to Dick Crawford, 4 and 3.  It was the last match Nicklaus lost as an amateur.  (That same year), In September at Pebble Beach, Nicklaus won his second U.S. Amateur and then in June of 1962 at Oakmont he won his first U.S. Open.  In Nicklaus’s book, My 55 Ways To Lower Your Golf Score,  the Golden Bear used the loss to Greenwood to illustrate how a golfer must not disregard percentages when determining how to play a shot during a match.

Greenwood broke his wrist playing church league basketball before winning the State Open in 1968.  The injury delayed his turning professional.  In the fall of 1969, he tied Johnny Miller for third in the PGA Tour’s qualifying school.  This was in the days when qualifying gave a player the opportunity to join Monday’s rabbits seeking berth in the tournament proper.  From 1969 through 1975, Bobby played the PGA Tour.  He made seventy-two cuts, six Top 10s, fifteen Top 25s, and $50,929 in official money.  At the 1971 Los Angeles Open, he led after fifty-four holes with rounds of 69-69-66.  He held a three-shot lead, but shot 73 the last round.  (His two-way tie for fourth with Lee Trevino) was his best finish on the tour.

Greenwood has been involved in the golf business his entire life.  His career has spanned almost every facet of the industry.  His credits includes being the director of golf at Sawgrass Country Club, the home of the Tournament players Championship at Ponte Vedra Beach, Florida; a design coordinator for Golden Bear International, Jack Nicklaus’s golf course design firm; president of his own golf course architectural firm and designer with (Greenwood-Tucker) of Fairfield Glade’s Dorchester course; editor-in-chief of one of Tennessee’s first golf publication, Nifty Knicker; and a partner in a golf school operation and a discount golf shop.

In 1964, Greenwood played in the Texas Cup matches.  The Tennessee Cup Matches were started in 1968 by Tennessee PGA Section president Hubert Smith and Nashville businessman John Deal, a great amateur player who was a member at Old Hickory and Richland and a director of the Tennessee Golf Association.  Bobby planted the seed for the event with Hubie, but it took four years for it to bloom.  Greenwood said:

  “I was to play Byron Nelson, who was the captain of the pro team, which was made up of all tour players, I thought he was old and couldn’t play much, but his scores were posted in the locker room and there wasn’t anything except 68s and 69s.  We were playing at Brook Hollow in Dallas, a great golf course.  I’ve played against a lot of great players, including Bill (Billy Joe Patton) Patton, Bill Hyndman, and Jack Nicklaus, but Byron Nelson, even at his older age, was the most intense player I ever played against.  I beat him by making a birdie on the eighteenth hole for a 67 and he shot 68.  When I played the tour later I had an occasion to meet him several times.  He would never remember who I was, I think it was his way of completely putting the defeat out of his mind.”

Greenwood discussed his friend and teacher Hubie Smith, golf pro at Cookeville Country Club where Bobby played as a youngster.

  “Hubie was my mentor, but we were also competitors and Hubie hates to lose.  I tell him about playing in the Texas Cup matches against guys like Don January, Billy Maxwell, and Byron Nelson and give him all of the details of how it was done.  We worked on the format and he asked me to pick the East Tennessee amateurs.  He said we were going to have twenty on a team.  I thought that would cheapen the event.  Texas has ten and we have twenty!  A few nights later he called me back and asked me to pick the entire team.  Whoever was supposed to pick the rest of the team got cold feet.  Because of politics they didn’t want to make the other picks.  I’m only twenty-six years old, but Hubie asks me to pick the entire team.  I played Mason Rudolph and Mason beat me, but our Amateur team won.”

** Source:  The History of Tennessee Golf: 1894 – 2001, Copyright 2002 by Gene Pearce, Hillsboro Press, Franklin, Tennessee,  pages 270-273.  Copied by Bobby and Elma Greenwood, Cookeville, Tennessee, October 27, 2003.

Published in: on August 23, 2006 at 2:10 am  Leave a Comment  

Career Profile of Bobby Greenwood

 EDUCATIONAL BACKGROUND

North Texas State University (now University of North Texas-UNT), Denton, Texas,  B.A. Business Administration, 1964.
Athletic Hall of Fame, Inductee, University of North Texas, Denton, Texas, 2002.

Riverside Military Academy, Gainesville, Georgia, 1957. (Postgraduate)
Received Horton Society (Honor) Award at graduation.

__________

CAREER TIMELINE

1998 – Present: 

Golf Course Architect ~ Bobby Greenwood & Associates, Inc.

President, Greenwood-Clifton Golf Design Group, Deltona, Florida.

1996-1997:

Design Coordinator ~ Golden Bear International (Nicklaus Design), North Palm Beach, Florida & New Augusta Golf Club, Ena Japan.

1992-1996:

Golf Course Architect ~ Bobby Greenwood & Associates, Inc.
President, Greenwood-Clifton Golf Design Group, Deltona, Florida.
Golf Architect ~ The Fairways on Spencer Creek Golf Club, Franklin, Tennessee.

1989-1991:

Director of Golf Operations ~ Suntree Country Club, One Country Club Drive, Melbourne, Florida. (36-hole resort with 1,650 members; and Home of Senior PGA Tour event).

1986-1989:

President ~ Greenwood, Frazee & Associates, Brentwood, TN. (Golf Course Design & Planning Services).

1986-1987:

Editor-In-Chief & Founder of Tennessee’s First Golf Publication (1/3 ownership).  

1984-1986:

Golf School Coordinator ~ Master’s School of Golf. (Partnership with Dave Ragan & Jack Wall).

1980-1984:

Golf Director ~ Benchcraft Golf Co., 1921 Church Street, Nashville, Tennessee.       (Golf schools, clinics and exhibitions).

1978-1980:

Golf Course Architect ~ Greenwood, Tucker & Associates (Designed and supervised construction of Dorchester Golf Course – Permanent Home of TN Open for 8 years).

1977-1978:

Director of Golf ~ Sawgrass Country Club, Ponte Vedra Beach, Florida
(Home of Tournament Players Championship).

1974-1978:

Contract Consultant ~ Planned Recreation Consultants, Inc., Jacksonville, Florida.

1969-1975:

P.G.A. Tour ~ Player 

__________ 

GOLF CREDITS

 NCAA All-America ~ First Team, 1963.
NCAA All-America ~ Second Team, 1962.
NCAA All-America ~ Honorable Mention, 1961.

North Texas State University, Denton, Texas,
(now
University of  North Texas-UNT).

Co-Medalist USGA Amateur, 1964. Canterbury Country Club, Cleveland, Ohio.  

Qualified & played in Four USGA Amateurs.

Qualified and played in Two U.S. Opens.

Texas Cup Team (Ten member team), 1964. Defeated Byron Nelson in single match.

Tennessee Cup Team, 1968, 1976, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1999, 2000.

Top 10 Amateurs in U.S. by Golf Magazine, Twice.
Ranked 6th and 8th respectively.

Top 10 Amateurs in U.S. by Golf Digest, 1968.
Ranked 7th. His ranked is based on a victory in the Sunnehanna as well as theT
ennessee State Open & his  finished third in the Southern Amateur.

Sunnehanna Amateur ~ Tournament of Champions, 1965, 1968. Johnstown, Pennsylvania (Tournament record of 269 set in 1965 and current course record of 63 set in second round in 1965).

Rhode Island Open Champion, 1970.

Tennessee Open Champion, 1968.

Tennessee Amateur Champion, 1966.

“Champions’ Choice” ~ PGA Tour Rookie, 1969.
chosen to play in the Colonial Invitational (NIT) voted by past champions.
Fort Worth, Texas.

Attended 1969 PGA Tour Qualifying School, 1969.
Palm Beach Gardens, Florida. (Tied Johnny Miller for 3rd).

PGA Tour Player for 7 years, 1969-1975.

Tournament Players Division – PGA Tour, 1972-1975.
(Voting member)

Winner of over 150 Amateur and Pro Tournaments in playing career.

PGA Member – Class A, 1971.

Tennessee Senior PGA Champion, 1991, 1992, 1994.

Tennessee PGA Section Championship, 1999.
7th place (72-72-70)

Tri-Cities Fall Pro-Am, Senior Champion (75-70=145) Bristol, Virginia.

Course Record: Southern Amateur Championship, 1968.
Score: 64 (-8 par), Lost Tree Golf Club,
North Palm Beach, Florida (Jack Nicklaus Home Course).
 

__________ 

CLUBS & ORGANIZATIONS

 Christian Partners, Inc., Board of  Directors

Fellowship of Christian Athletes
Upper Cumberland FCA Advisory Board Member, 2006.

Head Golf Clinician, FCA Camp, St. Augustine, Florida, 2006.

Head Golf Clinician, FCA Camp, Sawgrass CC, Ponte Vedra Beach, FL, 2005.

Head Golf Clinician, FCA Camp, Powell, Wyoming, 2005-2006.

International Golf Professional Association ~ Vice-President (1991-1992).

Boy Scouts of America (Eagle Scout-1954, God & Country Award, Silver Award, Arrow Head Award, Commissioner Award and Order of the Arrow Award).

Boy Scouts of America ~ Unit Commissioner, Middle Tennessee Council (1999-Present)

Cookeville Rescue Mission, Board of Directors (1982-Present)

Lettermen Association, UNT – Member, Denton, Texas.

Fellowship of Christian Golfers (Co-Founder & Director).

Optimists Club (VP & Board of Directors).

Gideons International ~Vice-President, Cookeville, Tennessee (2002-2004).

First United Methodist Church, Men’s Brotherhood ~ President,(2005-Present). Vice-President (2004-2005).

First United Methodist Church, Backslider Class ~ President (2006-Present). Vice- President (2005-2006).

First United Methodist Church Council ~ Member (2005-Present).

 National Eagle Scout Association (Executive Committee Member).

Mason, Grand Lodge Free & Accepted Masons Of Tennessee.Shriner, Nobles of the Mystic Shrine in Al Menah Temple of Nashville, Tennessee. 

 __________

SCHOOLS & EXPERIENCE

PGA Tour Player ~ seven years.
PGA Business Schools I & II, Palm Beach Gardens, Florida.
Co-Founder of Tennessee Cup Matches (Selected the entire amateur team – 1968).Golf Course Architect Consultant ~ Fairfield Glade, Inc. (1969-1972) Graduated: Service Maintenance School, E-Z Golf Car Division, (November 1976, Atlanta, Georgia).Golf Director ~ Supervised the golf program for Meadow Greens Country Club,
Eden, North Carolina, through busy season and hired the new pro for the club.
Principal-In-Charge ~ Designed and supervised construction of second 18-hole golf course for Fairfield Glade, Inc. ~ Dorchester Country Club (Home of Tennessee Open).

Coached Little League Baseball and Babe Ruth Baseball (1979-1984)
Coached Junior – Pro Basketball (1980-1986)
Winner ~ Boys’ State Championship, 1983
Winner ~ Girls’ State Championship & National Championship, 1986

Golf Architect ~ Designed and supervised construction of Fairways on Spencer Creek Golf Club, Franklin, Tennessee, 1994-1996.

Design Coordinator ~ for Jack Nicklaus in Japan, 1996-1997. Golden Bear International, North Palm Beach, Florida & New Augusta Golf Club, Ena, Japan.  

__________ 

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

        Upon arrival at Sawgrass Country Club in 1977, Bobby Greenwood instituted systems and reforms which resulted in an increase in revenue of $71,000.00 from merchandise sales in the pro shop. In addition, his responsibilities included that of being Host Professional for the first and second Tournament Players Championship held at Sawgrass. This included many diverse activities including PGA Tour and media responsibilities.

        Additional accomplishments during this period included:           

            ~ TV Golf Clinics for Channel 17, Jacksonville, Florida
            ~ Instructional Panel,
Florida PGA Jr. Golf Academy
            ~ Gator Bowl Executive Committee
            ~ Hillier Cup Team – Member (1977)

        In 1980, Greenwood completed the design of the Dorchester Golf Course for Fairfield Glade Resort and supervised the construction in the field. Dorchester was selected by the Tennessee Golf Association as the permanent Home of the Tennessee Open Golf Championship for eight years. He also served as Golf Director for Benchcraft Golf Company where they conducted the Master’s School of
Golf with Dave Ragan and Jack Wall.       

        In 1987, Greenwood co-founded Tennessee’s first Golf Publication where he served as Editor-In-Chief. He was one-third owner of this newspaper.       

        In 1989, Greenwood was contacted by Suntree Country Club requesting that he supervise their entire golf operations through their busy winter season because of the sudden illness of their Director of Golf. Suntree is a 36-hole complex with 1,650 members and home of the oldest tournament on the Senior PGA Tour.   

        While in Florida, he established Bobby Greenwood & Associates, Inc. and formed an association with the Clifton, Ezell & Clifton Golf Course Design Group located in Deltona, Florida.

        In 1994, Greenwood designed and supervised the construction of The Fairways on Spencer Creek Golf Club in Franklin, Tennessee.

        In 1997, he was Design Coordinator for Golden Bear International. Greenwood worked for Jack Nicklaus in their main offices in North Palm Beach, Florida and finally went to Ena, Japan to supervise the construction of New Augusta Golf Club, the most expensive course ever built by Golden Bear at a cost of twenty-two million U.S. dollars.

        Back in the ol’ U.S., Greenwood continued golf course design and playing golf once again as a Super Senior! 

Published in: on August 13, 2006 at 2:13 am  Leave a Comment  

Bobby Greenwood in Books

Greenwood’s Legacy Chronicled ~ Herald-Citizen

_______ * * * _______ 

I.  “MY 55 WAYS TO LOWER YOUR GOLF SCORE” by Jack Nicklaus, Simon & Schuster, New York, NY,1964, page 104. 

*The great Jack Nicklaus writes about his last defeat as an amateur. Match played in Memphis nine months before he won his first U.S. Open.

II.  “MY STORY”, by Jack Nicklaus, Simon & Schuster, New York, NY, 1997, page 53. 

*The famous match in the Colonial Amateur; Greenwood made eagle on 18 to get even and made birdie on the first hole of sudden death hole to win.   

III. “THE HISTORY OF TENNESSEE GOLF: 1894-2001” by Gene Pearce, Hillsboro Press, Franklin, TN, 2002, pages 10, 21-22, 28, 77, 174, 199, 257-58, 270-73, 284-85, 308-9, 330, 347-48, 352, 375, 381, 399-401, 21, 271.   

*Greenwood wins over 100 tournaments in Tennessee before he turns pro and plays seven years on the PGA Tour. 

IV. “SOUTHERN GOLF ASSOCIATION, THE FIRST ONE HUNDRED YEARS” by Gene Pearce. Printed in Canada by Friesens, Altona, Manitoba, 2004, pages 140, 142. 

*Bobby Greenwood shoots course record ~ 8 under par ~ ’64’ at Lost Tree Golf Club… home course of Jack Nicklaus. The record still stands… tied by Calvin Peete. 

V.  “THE HISTORY OF SUNNEHANNA COUNTRY CLUB AND THE SUNNEHANNA AMATEUR” by John Yerger III, Smith Lithographic Corporation, Rockville, MA, 2004, pages 95-96, 99

*Bobby Greenwood won the Sunnehanna Amateur Tournament of Champions twice in 1965 and 1968. In 1965, he shot the second round 18-hole Course Record of 63 and the 72 holes Tournament Record of 269. And 39 years later, still a course record holder.

Published in: on August 13, 2006 at 1:10 am  Leave a Comment  
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